Are You The Product?

Video: Charlie Behrens
Audio: Dave Stitch

Extract from the pitch video for an installation at this year’s Glastonbury Festival.

The multi-screen installation, which will appear in the Shangri-La field, is made from reclaimed 1990s broadcast monitors. It runs super-saturated loops and a night-vision enabled Hi8 camcorder which is fed through an analog video synthesiser. Augmented by bass-driven waveforms and typographic political slogans that reflect our data-skewed times, the audience is invited to interact with psychedelically effected video of themselves. If users are tempted to take selfies during the process the content of the surrounding screens will highlight the irony of how we often wilfully give up our data to nefarious internet behemoths while the servers that power them melt our planet.

       
     
Like Lies

The silent video loop 'Like Lies' (Which is one of the many video loops that will form the Shangri-La installation ‘Are you the Product?’) uses analogue video synthesis and typography to relay the message that we all too often blindly accept information through the devices we are addicted to.

       
     
Do You Crave The Unlimited?

15 min loop for 'Are you the Product' installation.

The 3 mobile network is offering 'Unlimmmmmmmmmmmmmited' data as a testament to how tasty it is to us. The more the better. People want 'all the things'. Everything at once. More, please! This taste for unlimited data can be extended to humanity's desire for abundance, whatever the cost.

The typographic repetition of the letter 'M', exaggerating even 3's use of the character is shown above footage of a gas flare burn-off and the Malaysian environment minister announcing she will send back containers of alleged 'recycling' from the West which are actually dumped on Malaysian soil.

       
     
Ideal World?

Idealism can be problematic in it's nature — although here the audience is invited to think about what it might look like to them.

The Debra Trione quote within the piece is from an essay which discusses how Utopian visions — which in most evoke images of nature and harmony between people — are also behind some of the actions of the worst dictators.